Wait. Think. Fast.

DALE TIEMPO AVAILABLE NOW

Producer and multi instrumentalist Matthew Beighley and Jacqueline Santillan Beighley, an Argentine-born singer and pianist, are the creative minds behind Wait. Think. Fast.. Listeners may have heard song placements from their first LP, 2010’s Luces del Sur, on shows like Quantico, Gossip Girl, and Grey’s Anatomy, to name a few.

“Life happens,” said the singer when asked about the seven-year gap between Luces del Sur and Dale Tiempo, their upcoming full-length record, which was released October 20th, 2017. But there’s an interesting twist: their mature, elegant, and exquisitely-crafted sophomore LP left behind their old band setup.

“When we moved to NY in 2011,” says Matthew, “We lost our band. We stopped writing music from a drum, guitar-based rock band perspective. Instead, we started writing with strings first, with the mellotron, or building entire pieces around choral arrangements. By 2014, after moving back to Los Angeles, we built our own studio. That gave us the ability to meticulously record everything. It was very inspiring and liberating to work that way.”

Sure, Wait. Think. Fast. has evolved their technical recording process, but also their emotional, lyrical content. Jacqueline found inspiration in her personal loss: “This entire record is a journey from isolation and loss, to acceptance and gratitude — it’s about family. It’s about losing my spirit and purpose, and suddenly losing my father, who was a huge figure in my life.”

Julio, Jacqueline’s father, graces the album cover. The photo was taken in 1979 shortly after his arrival to Los Angeles, having just undergone an epic journey from Argentina. “He was 28.” says the singer. “Looking at the photo, he looks like a young man with a lot on his mind. He’s on the precipice of something.”

Make no mistake: Dale Tiempo is anything but a bleak record. But, as the title suggests, Jacqueline underscores the power of healing through time, and also the circle of life: “Shortly after my father passed, our daughter was born. The last song on the record is named after her and, just like her, welcomes in the light, the hope, and tremendous love. The line ‘I want to be carried along’ first appears in the opening track ‘Count No Count’ as a longing for direction and peace. When it refrains as the closing lines in ‘Lucia,’ the final track, it’s no longer a plea, but an affirmation.”